GDPR, snooping tech, and data privacy — what does this all mean? Shawn Tuma explains

The EU’s GDPR, devices and services snooping on our privacy, and data privacy law – what does this all mean?

Shawn Tuma explains to CW33’s Morning Dose why the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) can be a positive step in the long run for simplifying data security and data privacy when compared to the multitude of different federal, state, and local laws in the United States.

Shawn Tuma discusses on The Michelle Mendoza Show on Seattle’s 820 AM, The Word

 

The EU’s GDPR, attorney Shawn Tuma discusses on the Steve Gruber Show

 

See also: INTEGRATING AMAZON’S “REKOGNITION” TOOL WITH POLICE BODY CAMERAS — SHAWN TUMA DISCUSSES ON CW33 MORNING DOSE

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Shawn Tuma (@shawnetuma) is an attorney with an internationally recognized reputation in cybersecurity, computer fraud, and data privacy law. He is a Cybersecurity & Data Privacy Attorney at Scheef & Stone, LLP, a full-service commercial law firm in Texas that represents businesses of all sizes throughout the United States and, through its Mackrell International network, around the world.

Integrating Amazon’s “Rekognition” Tool with Police Body Cameras — Shawn Tuma Discusses on CW33 Morning Dose

There has been an outcry over law enforcement using Amazon’s “Rekognition” facial recognition tool and integrating it with their body cameras for nearly real-time identification capabilities. CW33’s Morning Dose had cybersecurity and data privacy attorney Shawn Tuma on as a guest to discuss this issue, as seen on this video:

 

Here is another story with additional commentary by Tuma (2:01 mark):

 

See also:  The EU’s GDPR, devices and services snooping on our privacy, and data privacy law – what does this all mean? Shawn Tuma discusses on The Michelle Mendoza Show on Seattle’s 820 AM, The Word

 

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Shawn Tuma (@shawnetuma) is an attorney with an internationally recognized reputation in cybersecurity, computer fraud, and data privacy law. He is a Cybersecurity & Data Privacy Attorney at Scheef & Stone, LLP, a full-service commercial law firm in Texas that represents businesses of all sizes throughout the United States and, through its Mackrell International network, around the world.

Facebook Suspends 200 Apps for Data Privacy Concerns — What Does This Really Mean?

Facebook suspended 200 apps due to data privacy concerns, which it revealed earlier this week. Shawn Tuma explains some of the key points about this in the following television and radio interviews:

CW33 Morning Dose talks to cybersecurity lawyer, Shawn Tuma, about Facebook suspending 200 apps

Facebook suspends 200 apps following Cambridge Analytica revelations, what does this mean? Shawn Tuma discusses on 710 KURV in McAllen, Texas

See also: Cell phone carriers are sharing your real-time location with private companies, what does this mean? Shawn Tuma discusses on The Steve Gruber Show

 

Regulator says May 25 is not doomsday #GDPR

The approach to data protection, and the enforcement of it, should and will be the same 36 days from now as it ever was: Following the rules is the way to go. But if you fail there, yeah, there are going to be some problems.

“The aim of our office is to prevent harm, and we place support and compliance at the heart of our regulatory action,” Denham said. “Voluntary compliance is still the preferred route, but we will back that up with tough action where it’s necessary. Hefty fines can and will be levied on those organizations that persistently, deliberately, negligently flout the law. Report to us, engage with us, show us your effective accountability measures, and if you do, that’s going to be a really important factor when we consider any regulatory action.”

— Read on iapp.org/news/a/icos-denham-may-25-is-not-doomsday/

Marine corp data breach lesson: human error is often the cause and is preventable

There has been a data breach emanating from the U.S. Marine Corps Forces Reserve that impacted 21,426 individuals. The breach exposed their sensitive personal information such as truncated social security numbers, bank electronic funds transfer and bank routing numbers, truncated credit card information, mailing address, residential address and emergency contact information.

Calm down and press the pause button on the hysteria hype machine — it was not the Russians behind it! It was something far more treacherous when it comes to the real world of data breaches: it was human error.

In this case, it happened when an individual sent an email to the wrong email distribution list and the email was unencrypted and included an attachment that contained the personal information described above. You can read more about the breach here: Major data breach at Marine Forces Reserve impacts thousands

THE TAKEAWAY:  The important lesson to take away is that scenarios such as this are far more common than all of the super-sophisticated “hacking” type over-politicised stuff that we usually hear about through the media. This is the real world of data breach that most companies face far more often than they face state-sponsored espionage. In fact, research into actual data breaches reveals that 90% of all claims made on cyber insurance stemmed from some type of human error and, as reported by the highly reputable Online Trust Alliance, “in 2017, 93 percent of all breaches could have been avoided had simple steps been taken such as regularly updating software, blocking fake email messages using email authentication and training people to recognize phishing attacks.” The good news is this type of problem is preventable with some effort.

Below is a checklist of good cyber hygiene that, in reality, all companies should be doing these days. How do you make sure you’re doing it? You develop and implement a cyber risk management program that is tailor-made for your company and is continuously maturing to address the risks your company face — such as my CyberGard™ program.

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Shawn Tuma (@shawnetuma) is an attorney with an internationally recognized reputation in cybersecurity, computer fraud, and data privacy law. He is a Cybersecurity & Data Privacy Attorney at Scheef & Stone, LLP, a full-service commercial law firm in Texas that represents businesses of all sizes throughout the United States and, through its Mackrell International network, around the world.