#DtSR Podcast: Guest Host on Newscast

#DtSR RabbitI was a guest host recently on the Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast to give my take on the legal aspects of current cybersecurity news with host Rafal Los (@Wh1t3Rabbit) and co-guest host John Foster (@dearestleader). As always, it was a blast!

Listen to the Podcast  

Join the #DtSR Discussion on Twitter

For more great #DtSR content, check out the full Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast homepage and also check out these past #DtSR podcasts where I was a guest:

#DtSR Podcast: Latest Issues in Law and Cybersecurity

#DtSR RabbitI was a guest recently on the Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast to talk about cybersecurity law with hosts Rafal Los (@Wh1t3Rabbit) and Michael Santarcangelo (@Catalyst). As always, it was a blast!

Listen to the Podcast  

Join the #DtSR Discussion on Twitter

For more great #DtSR content, check out the full Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast homepage and also check out these past #DtSR podcasts where I was a guest:

SecureWorld Post: 4 Key Cyber Insurance Takeaways for Companies from Spec’s v. Hanover Lawsuit

In my latest post for SecureWorld, explain 4 key takeaways for businesses from the Spec’s v. Hanover lawsuit regarding cyber insurance. Check it out and let me know what you think:  4 Key Cyber Insurance Takeaways for Companies from Spec’s v. Hanover Lawsuit

 

Target Data Breach: What Has It Cost? What Has Insurance Covered?

Target, in a recent document filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, provided updated information on the financial impact of its 2013 data breach:

  • It now estimates paying $264 million in breach-related costs, ranging from litigation claims to the expenses it experienced for fixing systems and sending out information at the time of the attack (previous estimate were $252 million)
  • About $90 million has been covered by ­Target’s insurers

Source: Target: SEC won’t penalize it over 2013 data breach – StarTribune.com

Cyber Insurance: Social Engineering Not Covered Under “Computer Fraud” Insurance Provision

Losses stemming from social engineering scams like the business email compromise are not covered by “computer fraud” provisions of commercial crime insurance policies according to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in Apache Corp. v. Great American Insurance Co. Continue reading “Cyber Insurance: Social Engineering Not Covered Under “Computer Fraud” Insurance Provision”