Texas Bar Journal 2019 Cybersecurity & Data Privacy Update

The Texas Bar Journal’s 2019 year-end Cybersecurity & Data Privacy Update was once again provided by Shawn Tuma and addressed the following issues: Texas' New Data Breach Notification Requirements effective January 1, 2020Whether website scraping allegations are sufficient to invoke Texas and federal "hacking" lawsWhether viewing pictures on another's cellphone violates Texas "hacking" lawCyber Insurance -- why … Continue reading Texas Bar Journal 2019 Cybersecurity & Data Privacy Update

Scientists warn brain implants can be hacked and used to control people (and you thought I was kidding?)

Back in early 2012, I wrote a blog post about whether hacking a human would violate the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. Shortly after publishing it, I received a call from a guy in Austin who said: "dude, someone finally gets it, I need your help!" ... I responded that I was a lawyer, … Continue reading Scientists warn brain implants can be hacked and used to control people (and you thought I was kidding?)

former employee = current data thief

Fifth Circuit Upholds CFAA Conviction for Former Employee’s Misuse Causing Damage Based on Circumstantial Evidence

In United States v. Anastasio N. Laoutaris, 2018 WL 614943 (5th Cir. Jan. 29, 2018), the United States Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed a jury verdict finding Laoutaris guilty of two counts of computer intrusion causing damage, in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1030(a)(5)(A) and (c)(4)(B)(i) of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. Laoutaris … Continue reading Fifth Circuit Upholds CFAA Conviction for Former Employee’s Misuse Causing Damage Based on Circumstantial Evidence

What do we in the United States really want from our cyber laws?

In my newsfeed are articles in prominent publications discussing the problems with the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act from very different perspectives. In the "the CFAA is dangerous for security researchers" corner we have White Hat Hackers and the Internet of Bodies, in Law360, discussing how precarious the CFAA (and presumably, the state hacking laws … Continue reading What do we in the United States really want from our cyber laws?

Hacking Into A Company You Sold Can Get You Jail Time

A federal judge sentenced David Kent to a year and a day in prison and ordered him to pay $3.3 million in restitution and pay a $20,000 fine for accessing the computer network of Rigzone.com, an industry-specific networking website. Kent founded Rigzone.com, sold it for $51 million, and after the sale accessed the company's network to obtain … Continue reading Hacking Into A Company You Sold Can Get You Jail Time