Archive for category Social Media Law

Social Media Evidence From Facebook Used Get to Get Rape, Sodomy, Domestic Violence Charges Dismissed

Do you remember the reason I gave you yesterday, when I blogged about why you cannot delete social media posts or accounts once you anticipate you will be in a lawsuit? (see Do Not Delete Relevant Social Media Accounts or Posts During Lawsuits > Spoliation of Evidence) That’s right, because “the law has a right to […]

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Do Not Delete Relevant Social Media Accounts or Posts During Lawsuits > Spoliation of Evidence

“The law has a right to every man’s evidence.” The old saying means that when you are in possession of something that could be used as evidence, and you anticipate that you are going to be involved in a lawsuit that may have even a tangential relationship to that evidence, you have a duty to preserve […]

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Using Social Media in Your Law Practice – Presentation to Collin County Bar Association #ccba

Today I have the pleasure of speaking to a great group of Collin County lawyers in the Collin County Bar Association’s monthly general meeting about the practical and ethical considerations of using social media in a law practice as well as my own tips that I have learned by using social media in my practice. Here is are Prezi […]

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Using Social Media in Your Law Practice – Prezi Presentation

I recently had the pleasure of speaking to a great group of Collin County lawyers in the Collin County Bar Association’s Law Practice Management Section about the practical and ethical considerations of using social media in a law practice as well as my own tips that I have learned by using social media in my practice. Here […]

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Court Requires Yelp! to ID Negative Reviewers to Determine if They Are Real Customers

The Virginia Court of Appeals recently ruled that Yelp! is required to disclose the identities of 7 anonymous posters of reviews of a business. The Court reasoned that if the reviewers are customers of the business, their opinions are protected by the First Amendment, but if they are not real customers, their reviews are false […]

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