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Periscope Piracy Sets Up Grudge Match: Hollywood vs. Twitter

Shawn E. Tuma:

This is a prime example of the challenges that the law has when trying to keep up with evolving technology. The technology wins everytime and then we are left to clean up the mess later.

Originally posted on Variety:

Forget Mayweather-Pacquiao. There’s a more interesting fight brewing between Twitter and Hollywood.

The piracy of Saturday’s welterweight boxing championship enabled by Periscope, a livestreaming app recently acquired by Twitter, is setting up a conflict that could be just as brutal.

HBO and Showtime, which partnered on what will likely be the most popular boxing pay-per-view event ever, took a one-two punch of their own Saturday. First, they watched multiple pay-TV distributors experience technical problems transmitting the fight, which probably cut into their sales total.

But what made matters even worse is that countless people who did pay for the fight used their smartphones to re-transmit the fight to users of Periscope and, to a lesser extent, rival app Meerkat. Each stream reached hundreds or thousands of non-paying fans with a picture quality that was shaky and pixilated, yet still quite adequate.

If Twitter CEO Dick Costolo understood the implications…

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Why Hackers Love Companies Who Use Social Media – The Point

I read an interesting article that discusses the intersection between social media and cybersecurity. The gist is that the bad guys use information they learn on social media (recall my lessons on business situational awareness) to engage in social engineering / spear phishing attacks based upon that intel. Read more: Why Hackers Love Companies Who Use Social Media.

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New York Court Permits Service of Divorce Papers via Facebook

Social Media SwirlJustice Matthew Cooper, of the Manhatten Supreme Court, made a landmark ruling that permits a woman to serve divorce papers on her estranged husband via Facebook messenger. In this case, it only makes sense to permit this:

  • The husband has deserted the wife
  • The husband has no fixed address or place employment
  • The husband’s only contact with the wife has been via telephone and Facebook
  • The wife has been diligent in trying to serve the husband but he has refused to make arrangements to accept service

Read more: EXCLUSIVE: Judge says Brooklyn woman can use Facebook to serve divorce papers

This is an interesting development in the law. Just a couple of years ago, a Federal judge in New York refused to allow service via Facebook — and I blogged about that case as well as the then-ongoing debate in Texas about a legislative proposal to allow service of legal documents via social media. I am sure we will see more of it as this is the natural trend for the law to take.

-Shawn

Part 3 of Series: Simple Ways to Use Social Media to Build Your Practice in One Hour

cordellHere is the third and final post in my 3 part series on Cordell Parvin’s blog: Lawyers: Simple Ways to Use Social Media Marketing in One Hour: Part 3 | Cordell Parvin Blog.

If you missed them, here are the first two posts:

I also have several other posts where I discuss my coaching experience with Cordell — check them out and give him a call, he doesn’t bite! Here is his website and his blog.

Part 2 of Series: Simple Ways to Use Social Media Marketing in One Hour

Here is part 2 of my 3 part guest post series on my coach Cordell Parvin’s blog: Lawyers: Simple Ways to Use Social Media Marketing in One Hour (Part 2) | Cordell Parvin Blog.

Do you have a reasonable expectation of privacy in social network posts? No, here is why …

Social Media SwirlThere is no reasonable expectation of privacy in information you post on social networking sites, regardless of what privacy setting you use.  

That is the rule that can be taken from Nucci v. Target Corp., a recent opinion from an appellate court in Florida. The court’s rationale is set out below, with citations omitted:

We agree with those cases concluding that, generally, the photographs posted on a social networking site are neither privileged nor protected by any right of privacy, regardless of any privacy settings that the user may have established. Such posted photographs are unlike medical records or communications with one’s attorney, where disclosure is confined to narrow, confidential relationships. Facebook itself does not guarantee privacy. By creating a Facebook account, a user acknowledges that her personal information would be shared with others. “Indeed, that is the very nature and purpose of these social networking sites else they would cease to exist.” 

Because “information that an individual shares through social networking web-sites like Facebook may be copied and disseminated by another,” the expectation that such information is private, in the traditional sense of the word, is not a reasonable one.
As one federal judge has observed,

Even had plaintiff used privacy settings that allowed only her “friends” on Facebook to see postings, she “had no justifiable expectation that h[er] ‘friends’ would keep h[er] profile private. . . . ” In fact, “the wider h[er] circle of ‘friends,’ the more likely [her] posts would be viewed by someone [s]he never expected to see them.” Id. Thus, as the Second Circuit has recognized, legitimate expectations of privacy may be lower in e-mails or other Internet transmissions.

We distinguish this case from Root v. Balfour Beatty Construction, LLC. That case involved a claim filed by a mother on behalf of her three-year-old son who was struck by a vehicle. Unlike this case, where the trial court ordered the production of photographs from the plaintiff’s Facebook account, the court in Balfour ordered the
production of a much broader swath of Facebook material without any temporal limitation—postings, statuses, photos, “likes,” or videos—that relate to the mother’s relationships with all of her children, not just the three year old, and with “other family members, boyfriends, husbands, and/or significant others, both prior to, and following the accident.” The second district determined that “social media evidence is discoverable,” but held that the ordered discovery was “overbroad” and compelled “the production of personal information . . . not relevant to” the mother’s claims. Id. at 868, 870. The court found that this was the type of “carte blanche” irrelevant discovery the Florida Supreme Court has sought to guard against. The discovery ordered in this case is narrower in scope and, as set forth above, is calculated to lead to evidence that is admissible in court.

Thanks to my friend Dale Rodriguez for bringing this case to my attention.

Social Media Law Presentation Slides for MENG Webinar

I recently had the pleasure of presenting a nationally broadcast webinar on social media law to MENG (Marketing Executives Networking Group) which is a national network of top-level marketing executives. You can learn more about MENG by visiting its website and you can learn more about my presentation by visiting MENG’s webpage promoting the webinar.

Thanks to the hard work and experience of the MENG team, the technical aspects of the webinar were very smooth and the participants had fabulous questions that made it even better. Presenting to MENG was a great experience that I really appreciate!

The slides from the presentation titled Social Media Law: It is Real, and, Yes, It Really Can Impact Your Business are available HERE.

 


 

About the author

Shawn Tuma is a lawyer who is experienced in advising clients on complex digital information law and intellectual property issues. These issues include things such as trade secrets litigation and misappropriation of trade secrets (under common law and the Texas Uniform Trade Secrets Act), unfair competition, and cyber crimes such as the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act; helping companies with data security issues from assessing their data security strengths and vulnerabilities, helping them implement policies and procedures for better securing their data, preparing data breach incident response plans, leading them through responses to a data breach, and litigating disputes that have arisen from data breaches.

Shawn is a partner at BrittonTuma, a boutique business law firm with offices near the boarder of Frisco and Plano, Texas which is located minutes from the District Courts of Collin County, Texas and the Plano Courthouse of the United States District Court, Eastern District of Texas. He represents clients in lawsuits across the Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex including state and federal courts in Collin County, Denton County, Dallas County, and Tarrant County, which are all courts in which he regularly handles cases (as well as throughout the nation pro hac vice). Tuma regularly serves as a consultant to other lawyers on issues within his area of expertise and also serves as local counsel for attorneys with cases in the District Courts of Collin County, Texas, the United States District Court, Eastern District of Texas, and the United States District Court, Northern District of Texas.